Via the @BISDwiredTeam: Tom Spall, Brittni Branton, and Troy Kuhn

Must Have Monday: Texting Story App

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Must Have Monday: Texting Story App
This app has been one of my favorites this semester. Have you tried the Texting Story app? It is an app that is available on the Google Play Store and Apple Store. I have talked about iFake Text before. This site is fun to use, but if you want to expand on that, then try Texting Story. Texting Story let’s you create a story of texts, and then it makes it into a video that you can share.

Mrs. Ruiz showing students how the Texting Story app works.

We first tried it in Mrs. Ruiz’s classroom with her World History sophomore students, and they LOVED it. After learning about the French Revolution, Mrs. Ruiz had her students partner up and have a texting story between the Government and the Commoners. One student played the Government character and the other student played the Commoner character. The students were creative in how they would act if they were that character. 

Then we tried it in a finance lesson in Mr. Kenjura's classroom. It was a success there, too. 

However, these are the tips we learned-
*Have students write out what they are going to say on paper before typing it in app because it doesn’t delete anything you type.
*Show an example, but then let students be as creative as they want.
*Give plenty of time to finish it. It takes a while for students to come up with their texting conversation.

*We used this app on our Chromebooks through the Google Play Store!

How to use the app (download on Chromebook or iPad)-
1. Open app.
2. Clear story if there is a previous story written in app.
3. Click on settings to change the names in the texting story.
4. Click on name at the top right or left to change who is speaking.
5. Type texting story. Click right arrow to enter text in conversation.
6. When finished, click create story.
7. Share with teacher or classmates.

How can you use Texting Story?
*Have students create a conversation on what you just learned as an exit ticket.
*Have students pick two characters from a book to have a texting story in between each other.
*Have students listen to a texting story that you wrote on a concept that you want them to learn.

Here are some examples-



How would you use it?

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